Daily Archives: December 12, 2017

VBT – REVISION IS A PROCESS

TourBanner_RevisionIsAProcess

Revision is a Process – How to Take the Frustration Out of Self-Editing

by Catherine E. McLean

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

GENRE: Self-Help, Self-Improvement, Non-Fiction

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

BLURB

A first draft holds the possibility of what will be a great story. Revision turns that rough diamond into a spectacular gem worth a reader’s money and time.

Writers are individuals but to be a producing writer means creating a system to revise and polish a work so the reader thoroughly enjoys the story. REVISION IS A PROCESS is a guidebook for writers and authors that shows how a simple 12-step process can be tailored to eliminate the most common and chronic maladies of writing genre fiction. This valuable guidebook contains secrets, tips, practical advice, how-to’s, and why-to’s for taking the frustration out of self-editing.

~~~~~~~~~~~~

EXCERPT

From Section 1, An Overview of Revision is a Process

. . . revision is a process .  A logical, straightforward process where you don’t try to find and fix everything at once. Instead, you break the monumental task into component parts and focus on only an item or two at a time.

Okay, so the reality is that creative people,  especially writers, hate logic and straightforwardness. And it’s a fact that logic and creativity have always been at war with each other. After all, creativity gives a writer a high like no other. It’s the fun part of writing and storytelling.

On the other hand, revising, rewriting, and self-editing are linear, logical, objective—and not fun.

But necessary.

Ever so necessary if one intends to be commercially successful in the writing business.

Here’s something I’ve learned about writing and self-editing—a writer should find a middle ground. That means having the logical part of one’s mind work with the subconscious imagination (the creative self).

It’s about adopting a different view of self-editing—calling it a process—and diligently organizing that process into small steps that can easily be done. This gives a writer confidence that they have polished their story and increased its marketability.

I strongly believe, and have seen, that revision-as-a-process enables a writer to use both their left (logical) and right (creative) brain to become even more creative.

That’s because the writer not only tailors a one-of-a-kind process but they also develop their own revision master cheat sheets. As a result, the creative subconscious (the imagination) becomes aware of the pitfalls and glitches that must be checked for, and subsequently, little by little, the creative self dishes up better first drafts with far fewer errors.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

AUTHOR Bio and Links

AuthorPhoto_Revision is a Process

Catherine E. McLean’s lighthearted, short stories have appeared in hard cover and online anthologies and magazines. Her books include JEWELS OF THE SKY, KARMA & MAYHEM, HEARTS AKILTER, and ADRADA TO ZOOL (a short story anthology). She lives on a farm nestled in the foothills of the Allegheny Mountains of Western Pennsylvania. In the quiet of the countryside, she writes lighthearted tales of phantasy realms and stardust worlds (fantasy, futuristic, and paranormal) with romance and advenure. She is also a writing instructor and workshop speaker. Her nonfiction book for writers is REVISION IS A PROCESS – HOW TO TAKE THE FRUSTRATION OUT OF SELF-EDITING.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

RAFFLECOPTER GIVEAWAY

One randomly chosen winner via rafflecopter will win a $50 Amazon/BN.com gift card.

Enter to win a $50 Amazon/BN GC – a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~

INTERVIEW 6 – cant live without

by Catherine E. McLean * catherinemclean00@gmail.com

(alternate email: Catherine@CatherineEmclean.com)

What are four things you can’t live without?

I have to narrow this down to four? Okay, how about— pets, a typewriter, a computer, and a camera.

Pets— When my daughter needed a cat for a small animal 4-H project. Her 4-H book said it was best to start with a kitten. Cats being cats, it would be hard to tell what specific kitten would end up tolerating becoming a 4-H project. So we decided to get three kittens. Long story short—we ended up with seven kittens.

Breeze, whose mother was feral, became our house cat and the 4-H cat. As the years went by, some of the cats died until we were down to the last three. They succumbed to kidney failure at ages 16, 16.5, and 17.

All during the cat years, we had a dog. He died two years before the sixteen year old cat. So, being without pets sounded like a great idea, and the husband and I vowed that after the last cat passed there would be no more pets. Well you guessed it. The house seemed empty. After much soul searching, I decided to get a dog for myself. I wanted a lap-sized, dust-mop type dog. After three months of searching pet shelters and answering ads, I bought a mini Schanuzer-Bichon Frize female puppy. All fluffy gray. Her name is Mojee. She thinks she’s the cutest thing with each wag of her stubby tail. Please note Mojee has no aggressiveness in her at all. None.

Back to the cat situation. Without cats, little wild varmints invaded the house. Chipmunks and birds thought they owned our deck. At a fall Tupperware party hosted by Amish neighbors, I mentioned I was looking for three barn kittens about six months old (that’s old enough for the mother cat to teach them to hunt and be self-reliant). Again, cats being cats, there was no telling how good a hunter a kitten would be. I was hoping for one out of the three.

Long story short—in the spring I took ownership of three, identical “black” cats (no white) from an Amish farm two roads away. I named the kittens Winkin, Blinkin, and Nodd. Unfortunately, weekenders with a cabin came up over the 4th of July and ran over Winkin, killing him. Now I have two cats. Although it’s hard to tell them apart, both answer to Kitty-Kitty. Nodd prefers being a house and lap cat (she sleeps on my lap when I’m watching TV). Blinkin was renamed Mr. B and is a terrific hunter. As unbelievable as it seems, both cats love Mojee, play hide and seek with her, and allow her to drag them by the ear or paw across my hardwood floors.

There is nothing like waking in the morning to the thunder of twelve paws racing across hardwood floors.

As to the typewriter. I learned to type on a manual and despite the evolution to a computer, I have not only the original, manual, Smith-Corona portable typewriter my mom bought me when I was 16 but also a portable electric. When forms need to be filled out, an envelope typed, or I want to go downstairs and work on ideas for a story, I use the typewriter. There are still some things a computer cannot do as easily as a typewriter.

Which brings me to my desktop computer. I live in front of it when drafting a story, when doing blog posts, when communicating with other writers by email. It’s the workhorse of my office, my storytelling, and for doing my online workshops and courses  – http://www.writerscheatsheets.com/upcoming-workshops.html .

Lastly, I cannot do without a good camera. My first camera gave me black-and-white pictures and eventually I bought a 35mm Cannon, which opened a new world of photography for me. Currently, I own a Canon Rebel digital camera. I went from having film processed to downloading photos to my desktop computer. However, because I used film, which was expensive to develop, I learned to frame my pictures before I took them and limited myself to only three shots of anything. As a result, the only touch-ups I might make to pictures is to crop them. Often, I get the photo with the first click. My photos have even won blue ribbons at the local fairs.

My favorite subject is nature—flowers and rocks. Currently, I’m sky watching and taking pictures of clouds. I periodically post snapshots at my website http://www.CatherineEmclean.com (click on the menu for Photos & More). Take a look—which is your favorite?

# # #

 

 

 

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: